Haystack’s 2018 Summer lineup will be posted early- to mid-December 2017
The application process will begin January 1, 2018

As a reference, see below to review information from this past year’s
2017 season, session 3


3/CERAMICS

Century of War by Roberto Lugo, 2015. Porcelain, China paint, luster, underglaze 36” x 18” x 16.”

Century of War by Roberto Lugo, 2015. Porcelain, China paint, luster, underglaze 36” x 18” x 16.”

Superficial Substance:
The Ceramic Surface
This workshop will focus on processes specific to illustrating on the ceramic surface. Illustration has been used on pottery throughout human history—from the sgraffito used to draw on red and black Greek pottery to overglaze painting used to adorn Chinese wares—illustration and clay have been combined to celebrate and commemorate the history of the culture. Participants will use  handbuilding and wheel throwing to create canvases to explore techniques such as sgraffito, mishima, and overglaze painting, and will consider the substance of their illustrations while exploring how to combine traditional  forms of ornamentation. Concepts such as considering place, time, and the function of objects will be discussed. This workshop will help participants consider how to use imagery with vitality and fearlessness that is true to themselves and what
they hope for in their own work. All levels welcome.

ROBERTO LUGO was born and raised in Philadelphia to Puerto Rican parents. He is a potter, educator, activist, and public speaker, who bridges his experiences as a minority from an impoverished neighborhood with his desire to represent his culture within the discourse of the visual and performing arts. He received a BFA in Ceramics from Kansas City Art Institute, and an MFA from Pennsylvania State University. Roberto Lugo is a Professor at Marlboro College in Vermont and Director at Large for the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA). His work has been exhibited at SOFA, Collective, and FOG design fairs, and can also be found at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. robertolugostudio.com

 

3/DRAWING

Island by Claire Sherman, 2016. Oil on Canvas, 102” x 84.” Photo by Bill Orcutt

Island by Claire Sherman, 2016. Oil on Canvas, 102” x 84.” Photo by Bill Orcutt

A Wind-Storm in the Forests—
Visionary Landscapes

Basing its title on John Muir’s essay from 1894, “A Wind-Storm in the Forests”, this workshop will focus on imagined and constructed landscapes using mixed media in drawing. We will take field trips to walk through the local environment to gather source material from which to work. Landscape will be considered from many different perspectives—ranging from the allegorical to the history of the sublime—as well as current environmental concerns and investigations. While drawing outside and in various locations, participants will scavenge imagery and are also encouraged to bring photographs, clippings, and collage materials to use in their work. With these sources combined, we will bring drawings and photographs back to the studio to use in mixed-media works on paper in a range of sizes. Support materials such as readings and films—ranging from Edgar Allan Poe to Elizabeth Kolbert—will also be included. All levels welcome.

CLAIRE SHERMAN received a BA from The University of Pennsylvania and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She has completed residencies at the Terra Foundation for American Art, the MacDowell Colony, the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation, Yaddo, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council’s Workspace program. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at DC Moore Gallery, Kavi Gupta Gallery, DCKT, Aurobora, Houldsworth Gallery in London, and Huyser Gallery in Amsterdam. Recent group exhibitions include the Contemporary Jewish Museum, Neuberger Museum of Art, Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, Gallery Seomi in Seoul, Korea, and the New Gallery in Austria. Claire Sherman is an Associate Professor at Drew University and is represented by DC Moore Gallery and Kavi Gupta Gallery. clairesherman.com

 

3/FIBER/QUILTMAKING

The Ocean (from The Black Ocean Series) by William Adjété Wilson, 2008–2009. Appliqued polychrome cotton cloth, 39” X 70.”

The Ocean (from The Black Ocean Series) by William Adjété Wilson, 2008–2009. Appliqued polychrome cotton cloth, 39” X 70.”

A West-African
Appliqued Experience

Using the traditional technique of applique from the ancient kingdom of Dahomey (Benin), we will focus on how quilts can be used as a vehicle for storytelling that merge image and text together. In Fongbé language from Benin, the name for appliqued means “to enlighten the cloth.” The process of appliqué begins with drawings on paper that are used to create templates for transferring images onto sheets of fabric. Through traditional needlework and embroidery techniques, students will construct these images and patterns on larger pieces of background cloth with the intention of communicating
personal narratives or historical events.
Creativity and invention are the subtext for
this workshop. All levels welcome.

WILLIAM ADJÉTÉ WILSON is based in Paris, France and also works in West Africa and Haïti. He studied philosophy and anthropology in Paris and is a self-taught artist. He has been an artist in residence at Yaddo and the La Napoule Art Foundation, among others. From 2007–2009 he had six sojourns in Abomey, Benin working with traditional artisans to create a series of eighteen large appliqued quilts named “The Black Ocean.” This piece has exhibited over thirty times—in the US at The University of Michigan, University of Nebraska, and the Textile Museum in Washington, DC; and also in Brazil, France, Italy, Switzerland, Israel, and West Africa. He is currently working in Haïti on large “flags” (in beads) in a traditional studio in Port-au-Prince. williamwilson.fr/en

 

3/GLASS

Tngere by Alicia Lomné, 2016. Pâte de Verre, 6 x 4 ½.

Tngere by Alicia Lomné, 2016. Pâte de Verre, 6 x 4 ½.

 

 

 

 

Pâte de Verre: The Glass Skin
This workshop will focus on the process of Pâte de Verre. Participants will learn several different methods of color placement, patterning, and inlay and there will be\ discussions and documentation of the technical aspects related to mold making and kiln firing. In this intensive and fast paced workshop we will cover all of the basics of creating a model, pouring a mold, packing glass within it, and firing it; creating thin-walled glass vessels or other forms that use exact color placement. The understanding of Pâte de Verre has changed over the past decade, and we will explore other ways of working with inclusions, double firings, moldless forming, and other experimental approaches to the process. We will also take time to investigate our natural surroundings drawing inspiration and incorporating it into our work. All levels welcome.

ALICIA LOMNÉ is an artist based in Whidbey Island, Washington. She has spent the last eighteen years exploring and developing a unique style of working with the kiln casting technique of Pâte De Verre. Alicia Lomné has exhibited her work at the Bullseye Gallery, Ken Saunders, Habitat, William Traver, Museo, Deede Shatuck Gallery, and at the Kentucky Museum of Art and Design, Museum of American Glass, Figgie Art Museum, Berstrom Mahler Museum, the Muskegon Museum of Art, and the National Liberty Museum. Alicia Lomné has taught at Pilchuck, Penland, Corning Museum of Glass, Bullseye, and at some privately owned studios in the US. She has also taught in Switzerland, Denmark, England, and Australia. alicialomne.com

 

3/METALS

Arterial II (Brooch) by Daniel DiCaprio, 2015. Holly, milk paint, Gold leaf, 14K Gold, 4 ¼” x 1 ¾” x 1 ½.”

Arterial II (Brooch) by Daniel DiCaprio, 2015. Holly, milk paint, Gold leaf, 14K Gold, 4 ¼” x 1 ¾” x 1 ½.”

Wood Jewelry
Wood is an excellent material for making ornate and lightweight wearable objects. In this workshop we will explore small scale woodcarving techniques with an emphasis on jewelry applications. Both traditional and contemporary techniques will be demonstrated including rings, earrings, brooches, necklaces, and more. No previous experience with woodcarving or metalsmithing is required, although previous knowledge in either can be explored further throughout this workshop. All levels welcome.

DANIEL DI CAPRIO is a Professor of Metalwork and Jewelry at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He received a BS in Art Education from Nazareth College and an MFA in Metal Design from East Carolina University. His work is represented by Charon Kransen Arts and can been seen at SOFA Chicago, NY Design + Art, and Art Miami. Images of Daniel DiCaprio’s work have been published in Metalsmith, American Craft, Ornament, and Essence. Most recently he has collaborated with “Shared Concerns,” a traveling exhibition through the US, Australia, and Germany. dandicaprio.com

 

3/WOOD

House on Hillside Boxes by Kimberly Winkle, 2014. Polychrome Poplar, 10” x 20” x 8.”

House on Hillside Boxes by Kimberly Winkle, 2014. Polychrome Poplar, 10” x 20” x 8.”

The Fabulist’s Caddy: Storytelling
through Sculptural Boxes
Explore the poetic potential of blending object making, mark making, and box making to weave a tale that is visually engaging, tactilely inviting, and narratively intriguing. Working with the symbolic, familiar, and iconic, the relationship between form and concept will be investigated while creating boxes or containers that tell a story. Using a combination of machines and hand tools, students will learn techniques for sculptural box making—creating a variety of surface treatments—and for shaping wood. Group discussion and individual attention will foster development of ideas, personal visual language, and the transformation of story into physical form. All levels welcome.

KIMBERLY WINKLE is a studio artist who works primarily in wood and an educator who lives in Tennessee. She received a BFA in Ceramics from the University of Oklahoma and an MFA in Furniture Design from San Diego State University. She is an Associate Professor and Director of the School of Art, Craft & Design at Tennessee Tech University. Kimberly Winkle’s work has been exhibited at SOFA Chicago, the Architectural Digest Home Show, and Wanted Design. She was awarded a John D. Mineck Furniture Fellowship in 2014 through the Society of Arts and Crafts, and has been an artist in residence at Purchase College, the Vermont Studio Center, Haystack, and the Center for Art in Wood. Kimberly Winkle has taught workshops at Anderson Ranch, Arrowmont, the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, and the Appalachian Center for Craft. kimberlywinkle.com

 

3/VISITING CURATOR*

RACHAEL ARAUZ is an art historian and independent curator. She received a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and specializes in American modern art and the history of photography. She is currently co-curator, with Diana Greenwold, on a forthcoming exhibition about Haystack Mountain School of Crafts 1950–1969 (Portland Museum of Art, Maine, 2018). Prior curatorial projects include “Keith Haring: Journey of the Radiant Baby” for the Reading Public Museum, and “The Shape of Abstraction” for the Boston University Art Gallery, among others.

The Archive as Inspiration
Archival research can be a rich source of inspiration. We will discuss the ways in which archival research not only grounds scholarly work, but also inspires creative thinking about a project. Through examples of contemporary artists who use archives in their work participants will be encouraged to consider how these conversations and approaches have inspired or could inspire their own work.

* Visiting artists augment the session with informal afternoon conversations that are open to all workshop participants and faculty.

 

 

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