1/BLACKSMITHING

Andrew Hayes_blacksmithing_session 1

Basin by Andrew Hayes, 2016. Fabricated steel, book paper, and paint, 16 x 6 x 4.’’ Photo by Steve Mann

 

Thinking Big, Working Small
Workshop students will explore sculptural forms through forged, riveted, and mechanically fastened parts. Working with thin gauge plate and other small-scale industrial materials, focus and emphasis will be placed on creating small-scale sculptural pieces using joinery techniques, paired with inspiration from large-scale public works. Basic forging and joinery practice¾from forming, tapering and shouldering to punching, slitting and drifting¾will be covered. Students will gain experience riveting and bolting their sculptures with handmade hardware. Line and form in space – and how separate parts relate to one another – will be discussed and practiced, as well as finishing and patination, including material cleanup and prep. All levels welcome.

PATRICK J. QUINN currently runs the forging program at the Center for Metal Arts where he teaches resident blacksmithing classes and coordinates the visiting artist workshops. He has taught blacksmithing, fabrication, and tool making at Southern Illinois University, Penland, Hereford College Of the Arts, Adirondack Folk School, David Norrie School of Blacksmithing, and Salem Art Works. Patrick is a 2015 Niche award winner, and has work in the permanent collection of the Museum of Arts, History and Science Evansville, Indiana. His work has been featured in exhibitions such as “Transitions” in Belgium, “Forge” contemporary forged metal design in the UK, “Craft Forms,” and “43rd Mid States Craft Exhibition,” and has been published in Metalsmith Magazine’s juried exhibition in print – “Animal Instincts,” and the Anvils Ring fall 2017 Issue. patrickjquinn.com

 

Peter Pincus_Session 1_Ceramics

Urns by Peter Pincus, 2016. Colored porcelain, Gold luster, PC-11, 30” x 24” x 12.” Photo by Matt Wittmeyer

1/CERAMICS

Flat to Round: Exploring Imagery and Form

In this workshop, we will use hand building techniques and surface design to create decorated clay objects. Through a series of exercises, students will begin by producing a portfolio of imagery, patterns, and visual material, which will be used as a jumping off point to create pots, vessels, and objects. We will spend time inventing and conceiving three-dimensional forms in flat materials such as paper and poster board before moving into clay. Methods of soft-slab and hard-slab construction, designing bisque molds, making colored clay, and using colored slips for stenciling, sgraffito, and mishima will be demonstrated. A spirit of fearless curiosity and experimentation will be encouraged. Basic clay experience is helpful — All levels welcome.

LYDIA JOHNSON is a potter and designer who is currently an artist in residence and adjunct faculty at Appalachian Center for Craft, Tennessee. She received a BA from Messiah College and an MFA from Alfred University. Her work has been exhibited at The Clay Studio, Northern Clay Center, and Arrowmont. Lydia was the 2017 recipient of the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Tennessee Arts Commission and will have work featured in upcoming exhibitions at Signature Shop & Gallery, Lillstreet Gallery, and the Artstream Nomadic Gallery. lydiajohnsonceramics.com

 

Marianne Fairbanks_Session 1_Fiber

PWS Triad by Marianne Fairbanks, 2016. Hand woven on a digital loom (TC-1) wool yarn, polyester thread, reflective yarn, 24 ½” x 28 ½.” Photo by Gregory Vershbow

1/FIBER

Mending and its Metaphors

Mending and darning – once lost to contemporary life are now part of thinking about sustainability, consumerism, and other social issues. Mending is inherently intimate and personal¾a form of connection, an assessment of support, and gesture of care. What are the implications of objects that we, as owners and users, cannot repair, that we discard when they are worn or broken? We will explore a variety of repair processes and the ways they question our relationships to what we value and why. Our point of departure will be European, British, and American colonial era mending samplers. As we make our own samplers, we will expand out and consider other mending techniques, such as binding, splinting, gluing, and stapling. A knowledge of the structures of weaving, knitting, and crochet will be beneficial — All levels welcome.

MARK NEWPORT is the Artist-in-Residence and Head of Fiber at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. He received a BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His work has been exhibited at the Textile Museum of Canada, The Mint Museum, The Textile Museum at George Washington University, The Museum of Arts and Design, and the John Michael Kohler Art Center. Recent awards include grants from the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation, Creative Capital Foundation, Kresge Foundation, and Arizona Commission on the Arts. Mark’s work is in the collections of The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Arizona State University Art Museum, Cranbrook Art Museum, and Detroit Institute of Arts. The Simone DeSousa Gallery, form and concept, Duane Reed Gallery, and the Greg Kucera Gallery represent his work. marknewportartist.com

fensterstock_graphics-session-1_haystack2017

Colorless Field 3 by Lauren Fensterstock, 2015. Paper, installation at Leonard Pearlstein Gallery, Philadelphia, 23’ x 12’ x 6.” Photo by Constance Mensh

 

1/GRAPHICS

Title
Description. Prerequisites.

MELISSA POTTER bio. website.


1/METALS

Jaydan Moore_Session 1_metals

Ends by Jaydan Moore, 2012. Found Platters, 38” x 20” x 3.” Photo by Jim Escalante

Experimental Enameling 

Workshop participants will explore the medium of enamel, pushing the boundaries of traditional techniques and substrates. Champlevé on etched steel, sgraffito on found enamelware, and basse taille on salvaged metal are just a few of the alternative enameling techniques that will be covered. We will introduce color, texture, imagery, pattern, and text to your work with contemporary methods and materials, and will learn how to incorporate three-dimensional enamel elements into jewelry and small objects. Discussion and critique will focus on finding a unique voice with your work through the use of form, surface, and materials. All levels welcome.

SHARON MASSEY is an Assistant Professor of Jewelry and Metals at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She received a BFA from Winthrop University and an MFA from East Carolina University. In 2016 she was the only American chosen to exhibit in the 25th Legnica International Jewellery Competition in Legnica, Poland, and her jewelry was selected for Schmuck 2014 and Schmuck 2015 in Munich, Germany. From 2012 to 2015 Sharon served on the board of directors of the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). In 2009 she received the Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) Emerging Artist Award and was included in “Lucca Preziosa Young.” Her work has been published in eight books, including The Art of Enameling and Art Jewelry Today 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Editions, and is in the collection of the Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. sharon-massey.com

Zeke Leonard_Session 1_wood-instruments

reverb by Zeke Leonard, 2014. Reclaimed piano, mixed media, each approximately 30” long. Photo by David Broda

 

1/WOOD

Developed Drawing and Compound Angle Joinery

Developed Drawing and Compound Angle Joinery Before CAD, before computers, there was descriptive geometry. Armed with nothing but ruler, triangle and compass, builders designed complex structures involving volumes and curved surfaces intersecting at compound angles with precision. Using a process also known as developed drawing, various perspectives of the same three-dimensional object can be developed as two-dimensional representations that become working drawings for building. Drawing by hand offers a direct, intuitive understanding of spatial relationships, while simultaneously granting us temporary refuge from our ubiquitous screens. We will explore these processes by drawing and then building models from our drawings to validate their accuracy. As we gain fluency we will draw and construct models of hipped and valleyed roofs. Harnessing the power of descriptive geometry, each student will then draw and construct an elegant, joined version of that much-maligned yet iconic workstation of the builder, the splayed leg sawhorse. All levels welcome.

RAIVO VIHMAN is a woodworker and builder based in Freedom, Maine. He spent four years as a journeyman carpenter working in timber frame shops in Maine, Oregon, and North Carolina. In 2008 he founded Haystack Joinery, a design-build studio that focuses on sculptural timber framed structures with an emphasis on incorporating natural forms into the timberwork. He has studied traditional building techniques in France and currently uses traditional developed drawings and lofting practices learned with the Compagnons du Devoir in his design-build practice. Raivo has taught descriptive geometry at the Viljandi Cultural Academy in Estonia and timber framing at Waterfall Arts in Belfast, Maine and at Penland, where his students collaborated to build a structure which is now a permanent part of the campus. haystackjoinery.com

 


1/VISITING ARTIST*

Visiting artists augment the session with informal activities and are not workshop leaders.

KATE RUSSELL is a Brooklyn-based theatremaker and poet. She is the Founding Artistic Director of Threadbare Theatre Workshop and an Emerging Leader of New York Arts fellow. She received a BFA from Rutgers University and spent a yearlong residency at Shakespeare’s Globe in London. In addition to adapting and directing original stage adaptations of Moby-Dick and The Waste Land, Kate has directed such plays as Sarah Kane’s Crave, Jordan Harrison’s Marjorie Prime, and the first bilingual Korean-American presentation of The Vagina Monologues. She has performed in film and television as well as off-Broadway and regionally for the past ten years. As a teaching artist she has brought poetry and devised theatre to students off the rural coast of Maine and Shakespeare into the inner-city schools of London and New York. Her work as a theatremaker has been noted by Creative Capital’s ON OUR RADAR and named one of their 2016 “Artists To Watch.” kateroserussell.com

Occupy Poetry

    Threadbare Theatre Workshop’s Kate Russell, with Joshua McCarey
Kate Russell and Joshua McCarey will lead informal workshops based on their approach with Threadbare Theatre Workshop, which illuminates epics in a simple way through the magic of resourceful storytelling; laying bare our humanity so that we may thread more empathy into existence. We are committed to making theatre from scratch across the local landscape; engaging alternative spaces to foster creative partnerships within the community. We believe in a radically participatory theatre where every audience is a character in our play and every place a theater. We begin in silence, sculpt poetry through sound and movement, and a story is born. Threadbare’s Kate Russell and Joshua McCarey are currently in residence to workshop their upcoming endeavor, The Royal Tar, to be performed on Deer Isle this summer.

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