4/CERAMICS

Covered Pitcher with Kitchen by Julia Galloway. Porcelain with inlay slip, fired in soda kiln at mid range, 7” x 8” x 10”.

Covered Pitcher with Kitchen by Julia Galloway. Porcelain with inlay slip, fired in soda kiln at mid range, 7” x 8” x 10”.

Making New Ideas from Historical Pottery
In this workshop we will be developing new ideas for our studio work through studying historical pottery. We will be remaking historical forms, and using it as a jumping off point for new ideas in our own work. This workshop will include daily presentations of historical pottery from many countries and times. We will work with a variety of making techniques and firing temperatures. Some previous experience with ceramics preferred.

JULIA GALLOWAY is a utilitarian potter, Professor at the School of Art at the University of Montana. She exhibits, lectures, and teaches workshops across the US and Canada. She received a BFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University and an MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Julia Galloway’s pottery is in the collections of the College of William and Mary, the Archie Bray Foundation, the Long Beach Museum of Art, the Huntington Art Museum, The Crocker Art Museum, and the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. She is passionate about historical pottery, which deeply influences much of her studio work. juliagalloway.com

4/FIBER

Heirloom by Annet Couwenberg, 2014. Laser cutter, CNC router, origami, screws, buckram, and wood, 17” x 30” x 30”. Photo by Dan Meyers.

Heirloom by Annet Couwenberg, 2014. Laser cutter, CNC router, origami, screws, buckram, and wood, 17” x 30” x 30”. Photo by Dan Meyers.

More than Skin Deep: Structure, Fashion, and the Body
This fibers-based, mixed-media workshop will be an intensive exploration of sculptural objects created with a combination of traditional hand and innovative digital techniques. Expanding from the reference point of skeleton and skin we will establish a broad visual vocabulary of historical and contemporary sources through readings, discussions, and websites. Questions regarding the historical significance of cloth, clothing, fashion, and culture, and the role of digital crafts will be considered and used as a foundation as we work with laser cutting and engraving, origami, the bustle, crinoline, and corset. Other topics will include: armatures and surface coverings; millinery; sewing techniques (i.e. tucking and piping). Skills in sewing and Adobe Photoshop/Illustrator are a plus but not required. All levels welcome.

ANNET COUWENBERG is a Dutch artist and educator. She received an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art and an MFA in Textile Arts from Syracuse University. After nineteen years of chairing the Fiber Department at Maryland Institute College of Art, she stepped down to spearhead the development of Smart Textiles and Digital Crafts. Annet Couwenberg recently worked with a scientist as a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow and has received individual artist awards from the Maryland State and Ohio State Art. Annet Couwenberg’s work has been exhibited at the Gyeonggi MoMa and HOMA in Seoul, Korea; the Museum of Arts & Design, New York; the American Textile History Museum, Lowell, Massachusetts; and Decorative Arts Museum, in Arkansas, and is in collections such as the Textiel Museum in Tilburg, the Netherlands. annetcouwenberg.com

4/GLASS

One Rock Transport Adrift [In a Box] by Sean Salstrom, 2012. Blown glass, plate glass, water rope, flowers, rock, 56” x 8” x 10”.

One Rock Transport Adrift [In a Box] by Sean Salstrom, 2012. Blown glass, plate glass, water rope, flowers, rock, 56” x 8” x 10”.

Vessel as Vehicle for Glassblowers
A vessel is often a container designed around receiving, holding, and dispensing its particular contents. Sometimes it is used for keeping its contents protected and organized while traveling from one place to another, and sometimes it is itself a mode of transportation. Using hot glass we will explore the possibilities of vessel as vehicle, whether that may be a form of physical or metaphorical transport. We will cover basic and experimental methods for achieving forms using hot glass and will compliment this with constant discussions and visual presentations. Some hot glass experience preferred but not required. All levels welcome.

SEAN SALSTROM, an American artist and educator who lives and works in Akita, Japan, has trained with many artists including Peter Ivy, Michael Scheiner, Jocelyne Prince, Dan Dailey, and Dale Chihuly. He received a BFA in Glass from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and an MFA in Glass from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Sean Salstrom has taught Glass at RISD and the Toyama City Institute of Glass Art, Japan. He is a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award Nominee and three-time nominee for the Irvin Borowsky Prize in Glass and his work has exhibited in the US and Japan, including at the Center on Contemporary Art in Seattle, Washington; The Wassaic Project, New York; The Nizayama Forest Art Museum in Japan; and The Nagoya University of Art. seansalstrom.com

4/GRAPHICS

Chatelaines by Erin Sweeney, 2012. Screenprinted muslin, machine stitched; Hedi Kyle’s Chinese Sewing Box Book, mixed media, 4 1/2” x 2 1/2” x 2” (closed).

Chatelaines by Erin Sweeney, 2012. Screenprinted muslin, machine stitched; Hedi Kyle’s Chinese Sewing Box Book, mixed media, 4 1/2” x 2 1/2” x 2” (closed).

A Letterpress, an Artist’ Book, and some text walk into a bar…
This intensive workshop will focus on the depth and breadth of the artists’ book. Participants will learn a variety of printmaking techniques using a Kelsey platen press and a Showcard proof press, experimenting with alternative materials, as well as type, to create imagery. Using materials we have created, we will construct several artists’ books—these structures will combine traditional techniques (folding, binding) and materials with innovative structures. We will also work with text—generated through several simple prompts—and look to house image, text, and objects in new and surprising ways. Students will also have the opportunity to collaborate, and the emphasis will be on fun and experimentation. All levels welcome.

ERIN SWEENEY lives and works in southern New Hampshire, where she runs Lovely In The Home Press. She received a BFA in Sculpture from the Maine College of Art in Portland and an MFA in Book Arts and Printmaking from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, where she was awarded the Elizabeth C. Roberts Prize for Graduate Book Arts. Erin Sweeney has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, most recently at Abecedarian Gallery in Denver, Colorado, and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She teaches Book Arts and Letterpress printing at the New Hampshire Institute of Art and travels widely to teach workshops. erinsweeney.net

4/METALS

Cluster by Julia Harrison, 2013. Balsa, cherry, glue, sterling, epoxy, and wax, 3” x 1 1/5”.

Cluster by Julia Harrison, 2013. Balsa, cherry, glue, sterling, epoxy, and wax, 3” x 1 1/5”.

Wearable Wood + Metal
Like peanut butter and chocolate, wood and metal are great materials that work well together, but combining them successfully is not always so simple. This workshop will equip participants with the techniques necessary to create beautiful, wearable objects from wood and metal. Students will learn versatile approaches, including piquestyle inlay, making mixed material chains, attaching findings (e.g. earposts and ring shanks), and stone setting in wood, and will get familiar with appropriate adhesives and durable finishes. Previous jewelry or wood experience is helpful but not required. All levels welcome.

JULIA HARRISON is a Seattle based artist and anthropologist. Her work has appeared at the Bellevue Arts Museum, Washington; the Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin; and Electrum, London, UK, and is in the collections of the University of Arkansas and the Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland, Oregon. Julia Harrison has taught at the 92nd St Y, Snow Farm, and Penland, and was a 2015 Windgate ITE Fellow at the Center for Art in Wood, Pennsylvania. She balances artmaking with research on sweet foods, and can happily talk for hours about mochi. juliaharrison.net

4/WOOD

Intimate Beats by Tommy Simpson, 2004. Cherry, butternut, walnut, and mahogany, 80” x 25” x 3”. Photo by Brad Stanton.

Intimate Beats by Tommy Simpson, 2004. Cherry, butternut, walnut, and mahogany, 80” x 25” x 3”. Photo by Brad Stanton.

The Poetic Heart
The activity of this workshop is to enjoy and embrace the making of a joyful object—one may build a chair, ladder, table, stool or carved box. So, let obligation and the world disappear, grab your inner child and free play with your poetic heart. It has been certified that play is the medium/source for the presence of creativity. Consequently we will chip, gauge, pound, paint, stain, sand, saw, twist, laminate. We may even jog, doodle, and smile. Experience with power tools is required.

TOMMY SIMPSON is an internationally recognized artist, woodworker, sculptor, furniture maker, painter, and poet—he works in nearly every medium. After he received an MFA in Painting from Cranbrook Academy of Art, he turned to furniture as both a subject matter and a three-dimensional canvas. Tommy Simpson’s work has been in gallery and museum exhibitions, including at the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; Museum of Arts & Design, New York; and Gallery NAGA and Fuller Craft Museum in Massachusetts. He and his work have been profiled in Art in Review and Tommy Simpson – Homemade, written by Ken Johnson for The New York Times.

4/VISITING CRITIC

LARRY BLUMENFELD has curated the Deer Isle Jazz Festival for Opera House Arts since its inception in 2000, in collaboration with Haystack. His writing spans jazz criticism, narrative journalism, essays, profiles, and opinion pieces, addressing a wide range of music, often focused on social justice, spirituality, and improvisation as a reflection of contemporary life. Larry Blumenfeld has been a regular contributor to The Wall Street Journal for the past decade; his culture reporting and criticism have appeared in The Village Voice, The New York Times, and Entertainment Weekly, among other publications, and at websites including Salon and Truthdig. His jazz blog, “Blu Notes,” (blogs.artinfo.com/blunotes) is hosted by Blouin Media, publishers of Art & Auction magazine and his essays have appeared in many collections, including Best Music Writing, 2008 (Da Capo Press). Larry Blumenfeld was a National Arts Journalism Program Fellow at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and a Katrina Media Fellow with the Open Society Institute, researching cultural recovery in New Orleans. He has lectured and presented at a wide range of festivals, schools, and cultural institutions, including Lincoln Center, Carnegie Hall, the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

Larry Blumenfeld’s residency at Haystack is in conjunction with the 17th Annual Deer Isle Jazz Festival at the Stonington Opera House, produced by Opera House Arts, August 12-13, 2016. operahousearts.org


*Visiting artists augment the session with informal activities and are not workshop leaders.

 

 

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