3/BASKETS

Class by Lissa Hunter, 2015. Basketry and painting, 38” x 48” x 3”.

Class by Lissa Hunter, 2015. Basketry and painting, 38” x 48” x 3”.

Connect / Contain
Baskets are traditionally made with natural materials, using mechanical connections, creating vessel forms. We will extend the tradition by using unusual materials and non-traditional connections to make expressive vessel forms. After exploring the possibilities of many materials and ways of connecting them we will spend some time generating ideas and creating strategies for putting it all together to come up with individual work, which may be connected to your current work or completely new. Be ready to rip, stitch, twine, staple, rivet, fold, notch, paint, draw, laugh, think, succeed, fail, and tune your own voice. All levels welcome.

LISSA HUNTER is a studio artist living and working in Portland, Maine. For over thirty years her work has been at the forefront of the contemporary basketry movement and is in the collections of the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC; Boston Museum of Fine Arts; Museum of Arts & Design; and the Racine Art Museum, Wisconsin, among others. Recently she has included clay as a major focus of her work. Lissa Hunter teaches and writes as a part of her practice and is pleased to be on the Haystack Board of Trustees. lissahunter.com

3/CERAMICS

Between ceramics and stone by Bai Ming, 2014. Petunse, yellow cast, 6 1/3” x 29”.

Between ceramics and stone by Bai Ming, 2014. Petunse, yellow cast, 6 1/3” x 29”.

Chinese Contemporary Ceramics
The tradition of scholars’ rocks in China traces back to the early Song dynasty. Pitted, hollowed out, and perforated, such rocks were carefully displayed and prized for their ability to encapsulate the dynamic transformational processes of nature. Through hand building, carving and modeling, participants in this workshop will work alongside celebrated Chinese artist, Bai Ming, to produce a series of works inspired by this rich tradition. All levels welcome.

BAI MING is a renowned Chinese ceramic artist, painter, writer, and teacher. He lectures at the College of Fine Art of Tsinghua University. Mr. Bai is a member of the China Artists Association (CAA), China Oil Painting Society (COPS), the International Academy of Ceramics (IAC) of UNESCO. He is the art majordomo of China Ceramic Art Net and also an editor for Chinese Ceramic Artists. Currently, Bai Ming is running his own artist residency program in Shangyu, a southern city of China.

3/FIBER/MIXED MEDIA

Bestia by Mo Kelman, 2012. Shibori resist-dyed and shaped silk, sewn construction, and wire construction, 36” x 11” x 14”. Photo by Chee-Heng Yeong.

Bestia by Mo Kelman, 2012. Shibori resist-dyed and shaped silk, sewn construction, and wire construction, 36” x 11” x 14”. Photo by Chee-Heng Yeong.

Skins and Skeletons: 3D Textile Constructions
In this experimental workshop you will learn methods for building skeletal structures with rigid and semi-rigid materials like reed, rattan, bamboo, wood, wire, and found materials. Methods will include lashing techniques, formal and chaotic plaiting, and wire construction. To build skins onto these structures, techniques for working with gut, rice papers, elastic fabrics, nets, wax, and stiffeners will be presented. Exercises, brainstorming sessions, and problem solving challenges during week one will lead to focused personal projects during week two. Works may evolve as sculptures, vessels, or illuminated forms. All levels welcome.

MO KELMAN is a sculptor, fiber artist, and Professor of Art at the Community College of Rhode Island. Her artwork combines membrane-like materials with lashed skeletal structures—her tensile sculptures seek a point of balance that is tentative and temporary. A recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Mo Kelman has exhibited her work at the Cleveland Museum of Art’s May Show; the British Crafts Centre; Korea’s Cheongju International Craft Biennale; the International Shibori Symposia in Nagoya, Japan and Hong Kong; Brown University’s Bell Gallery in Rhode Island; and the Worcester Center for Crafts in Massachusetts. She is a recipient of a 2012 Artist’s Fellowship from the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. mokelman.com

3/GLASS

Pile of folded jeans: The scent of detergent hinted at her days labor as he headed towards the drought infested fields in the break the day (detail) by Cassandra Straubing, 2015. Cast glass, found artifact, 37” x 12” x 8 1/2”. Photo by Elizabeth Torrance.

Pile of folded jeans: The scent of detergent hinted at her days labor as he headed towards the drought infested fields in the break the day (detail) by Cassandra Straubing, 2015. Cast glass, found artifact, 37” x 12” x 8 1/2”. Photo by Elizabeth Torrance.

Material Samples; An Exploration of Mold Making for Glass Casting
This workshop will be a rapid-fire exploration of non-traditional, cast glass techniques, exploring the process of taking an investment mold directly off of different materials such as fabrics and paper, circumnavigating the need for a rubber mold. We will also explore different mold making materials for your objects, including alginates for body parts and brush-on, two part rubber molds. With our work in the kiln, we will discuss essential firing and annealing theories for cast glass. All levels welcome.

Currently the Glass Faculty Head at San Jose State University in California, CASSANDRA STRAUBING serves as the President of the Board of Directors for the international Glass Art Society. She received a BFA from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and an MFA in Glass from Rochester Institute of Technology, New York. Cassandra Straubing’s sculptural work addresses issues of domestic, agricultural, and industrial labor using multiple mediums and processes including cast and blown glass fabrication. Her work can be seen at the Bullseye Glass Co., Oregon and Habatat Galleries, Michigan. cassandrastraubing.com

3/METALS

Untitled by Damon Thompson, 2013. Found materials, copper, and steel, 1” x 1” x 1/2”.

Untitled by Damon Thompson, 2013. Found materials, copper, and steel, 1” x 1” x 1/2”.

Found
The focus of this workshop is incorporating found objects into jewelry or sculptural objects with narrative content or as unique design explorations. Techniques covered will include: basic to advanced fabrication, cold-connections, and traditional and nontraditional stone setting. Participants will bring items to be used as inspiration for and/or inclusion into their designs. All levels welcome.

DAMON THOMPSON is an artist, educator, and metalsmith living and working in Baltimore, Maryland. He is currently a faculty member at Towson University teaching Introductory through Advanced Metals + Jewelry. He has also taught at Maryland Institute of Art Jewelry Center and the 92nd St Y Jewelry Center in New York City. Damon Thompson received a BFA in Metals from the Oregon College of Art and Craft and an MA in Interdisciplinary Design Studies from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London, England.

3/PAPERMAKING

Treasure map by Aimee Lee, 2012. Acrylic, paper thread, and handmade mulberry paper, 8 3/4” x 11”.

Treasure map by Aimee Lee, 2012. Acrylic, paper thread, and handmade mulberry paper, 8 3/4” x 11”.

Paper Contains the Universe
This workshop combines reflective time with intensive studio work as we create and transform paper in Eastern and Western styles with a variety of fibers, to understand how paper emerges from the earth and becomes anything we wish it to be. We will begin with paper mulberry, processing virgin fiber into tissue thin sheets, move to ever versatile abaca, and use natural dyes and finishes. Then we will explore the endless possibilities of paper as thread, yarn, rope, textile, book, and basket. All levels welcome.

AIMEE LEE is an artist, papermaker, and writer. She received a BA from Oberlin College, Ohio and an MFA from Columbia College Chicago, Illinois. Her Fulbright research on Korean paper led to her award-winning book, Hanji Unfurled, and the first US hanji studio at Morgan Conservatory, Ohio. She has taught at North Bennet Street School, Peters Valley, Penland, and Women’s Studio Workshop. Aimee Lee’s work has been in exhibitions at the Fuller Craft Museum, Massachusetts; Islip Art Museum, New York; and Museum of Nebraska Art; and was featured in Surface Design, Hand Papermaking, and Textile Fibre Forum. aimeelee.net

3/VISITING WRITER*

ELIZABETH SPIRES is the author of six collections of poetry, most recently Worldling, Now the Green Blade Rises, and The Wave-Maker (all W. W. Norton & Company), and six books for children. Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, Atlantic, Poetry, American Poetry Review, New Republic, and the Paris Review. Elizabeth Spires has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the Cullman Center at the New York Public Library. She lives in Baltimore and co-directs the creative writing program at Goucher College.

Nine or Ten Ways of Writing a Poem
In the spirit of Wallace Stevens’s famous blackbird, we will circle the writing of a poem by considering various, diverse approaches. We will look at what is near at hand, the water, wind, and light of Deer Isle and the daily and seasonal cycles of Maine. We will move on to consider how to shape and organize a poem using familiar and unfamiliar structures and constraints. Writing prompts, accompanied by example poems, will be introduced each day in an informal, interactive setting.

*Visiting artists augment the session with informal activities and are not workshop leaders.

 

 

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