2/BOOK ARTS

Ilex laevigata, male and female by Rebecca Goodale, 2014. Silkscreen prints, interlocking book, 16” x 22” x 48”.

Ilex laevigata, male and female by Rebecca Goodale, 2014. Silkscreen prints, interlocking book, 16” x 22” x 48”.

Artist’s Books: The Balancing Act of Concept and Form
At every turn you will discover a myriad of choices all leading the way to success. The rich complexity of the artist’s book involves rhythm, pace, and form and is driven by a desire to express an idea and/or narrative over and across the pages. In this workshop participants will develop a vocabulary of book structures and then consider appropriate concepts to use with those forms. Demonstrations, design exercises, and various book arts techniques (including binding) will engage participants at all levels. All levels welcome.

Since 2000, Maine artist REBECCA GOODALE has been creating artist’s books about plants and animals currently listed as threatened or endangered by the state of Maine. With this body of work, now over eighty titles and counting, Rebecca Goodale aims to raise awareness and appreciation of Maine’s endangered flora and fauna, not as a botanist would, but as a visual artist fascinated by her subject’s complex beauty. Her work is in numerous collections including Bowdoin College Library; The Maine Women Writers Collection; Herron Art Library, Indiana; New York Public Library; Smithsonian African Museum of Art; and the Library of Congress. Rebecca Goodale is the Faculty Director of the University of Southern Maine’s Book Arts at Stone House program.

2/CERAMICS

Jar #736 by Daniel Johnston, 2015. Local woodfired, salt glaze stoneware, 36” x 24”.

Jar #736 by Daniel Johnston, 2015. Local woodfired, salt glaze stoneware, 36” x 24”.

Making Large Jars from Local Materials
Workshop participants will learn to make large pots with a coiling technique derived from Northeast Thailand. Using resources from the Deer Isle area, you will learn how locally sourced materials can be used to improve slips and glazes. Rather than bisque firing, you will learn how to decorate and glaze raw pots, needing only one firing. We will culminate in firing the pots in a salt kiln. This workshop will help you to understand the skills and studio practices needed in large vessel production. All levels welcome.

After four years as an apprentice with Mark Hewitt, DANIEL JOHNSTON traveled to England to work with earthenware potter Clive Bowen. His training then took him to Northeast Thailand to work with Mr. Sawein Silakhom in a jar factory where he learned traditional large jar making techniques. Daniel Johnston Pottery was established in 2003 in Seagrove, North Carolina, where he makes large wood-fired jars, as well as functional tableware, from local materials. Over the past twelve years, Daniel Johnston has embarked on several large projects such as the 100 Large Jar Project. danieljohnstonpottery.com

2/FIBER/DYEING

Elin Noble making a color reference library. Photo from a 2014 workshop.

Elin Noble making a color reference library. Photo from a 2014 workshop.

Natural Dyes, New Methods
Discover the magic of dyeing natural fibers (cotton, linen, and silk) with a wide range of colorfast natural dyes (including cochineal, pomegranate, Himalayan rhubarb, weld, and madder). Each participant will use mordants and dye extracts to construct a color library, which will then be used as a reference for individual projects. The techniques explored in this workshop include shibori, painting, printing, discharge, and overprinting. We will also explore how to make, use, and maintain, an eco-friendly indigo vat. All levels welcome.

ELIN NOBLE is an artist based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, where she pursues her ongoing interests in dyeing and teaching. She is the author of Dyes & Paints: A Hands-On Guide to Coloring Fabric and has lectured and conducted workshops across North America and internationally, most recently in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan. Elin Noble has had one-person exhibitions at the Schweinfurth Art Center, New York; The Textile Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Visions Art Museum, California; and the La Conner Quilt and Textile Museum, Washington. elinnoble.com

2/GLASS

The little things by Hiromi Takizawa, 2015. Kiln formed and hand blown glass, each glass rock is approximately 5” x 3” x 2”.

The little things by Hiromi Takizawa, 2015. Kiln formed and hand blown glass, each glass rock is approximately 5” x 3” x 2”.

Craft Navigation 360° / Craftsmanship Ahoy!
In this introductory glass blowing workshop, students will explore both functional and sculptural glass working. We will investigate the inherent qualities of glass, nurturing creativity, while simultaneously developing the foundational skills of glassblowing. Group discussion and individual attention will focus on the development of sketches, problem solving methods, and transformation of ideas into forms that are unique and personal. For beginning glassblowers.

HIROMI TAKIZAWA was born and raised in Nagano, Japan and lives in southern California. She received an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University and is currently an Associate Professor in Glass at California State University, Fullerton. Curiosity, experimentation, narrative, and materiality are the core concepts in her work, which has been exhibited nationally and internationally including solo exhibitions at Heller Gallery and Urban Glass in New York, and group exhibitions in Ohio, Michigan, Virginia, and Bergen, Norway. hiromitakizawa.com

2/METALS

Retrospective by Kristin Mitsu Shiga, 2002. Sterling, brass, copper, acrylic, found objects, 4 1/2” x 3 1/4” x 1/2”.

Retrospective by Kristin Mitsu Shiga, 2002. Sterling, brass, copper, acrylic, found objects, 4 1/2” x 3 1/4” x 1/2”.

The Language of Jewelry
Develop your conceptual, technical, and design vocabularies in this intensive workshop. Beginning and advanced students will discover (or refine) their creative voice as it relates to narrative jewelry and personal storytelling. Playfully probing morning exercises will inform and inspire independent work. In addition to instruction on metal fabrication, we will explore how alternative materials such as wood, acrylic, and found objects can infuse our work with meaning. Our aim will be to challenge ourselves on both a technical and personal level, and come away transformed. All levels welcome.

KRISTIN MITSU SHIGA lives and works in the arts in Portland, Oregon, where she splits her time between the studio and the classroom. She is influenced creatively by participation in collaboration events, including the EMMA International Collaboration in Canada and CollaboratioNZ in New Zealand. Kristin Mitsu Shiga’s work is featured in Art Jewelry Today, The Art of Enameling and several of Lark’s 500 series. Her work has been shown internationally, and is included in several notable collections, including the Permanent Collection of the White House. kristinmitsushiga.com

2/MIXED MEDIA

Machine with Cat Whiskers by Arthur Ganson, 1992. Steel wire, cat whiskers, 16 1/2” x 10” x 5”.

Machine with Cat Whiskers by Arthur Ganson, 1992. Steel wire, cat whiskers, 16 1/2” x 10” x 5”.

Mixed Media / Machines
Forget everything you assume about the machine and come ready to play, explore, and invent. This experimental workshop will focus on hand-made machines constructed of found materials – the more unexpected and unusual the better! Can you build a machine out of nothing but string and super glue? How about just dried seaweed? Participants will learn basic mechanics and will become “micro-experts” with their chosen materials—discovering their unique capacities as they invent processes, techniques, and ultimately, machines never before conceived. Together and as a group we will scratch our heads, build, and hopefully laugh a lot. All levels welcome.

ARTHUR GANSON has been making kinetic sculpture since 1977. For the past twenty years he has maintained an ongoing exhibition at the MIT Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Solo exhibitions include the DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, Massachusetts and the Kohler Museum in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Arthur Ganson’s sculpture was profiled in Smithsonian Magazine in 1996 and he spoke at the TED conference in 2004. arthurganson.com

 

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