1/BLACKSMITHING

Long Way Home by Stephen Yusko, 2014. Forged, machined, and fabricated steel, 39 ¾” x 61 ¼” x 9 ¼”.

Long Way Home by Stephen Yusko, 2014. Forged, machined, and fabricated steel, 39 ¾” x 61 ¼” x 9 ¼”.

 

Combining Forces
In this co-taught workshop, participants will explore inventive uses of material through creative problem-solving. Emphasis will be on the exploration of form, line, and surface while working with forged and fabricated steel to create furniture (mostly) that incorporates vessel forms and sculptural elements. Through discussions about design and function—and demonstrations of techniques—we will work to create objects that balance the industrial history of steel with a gracefulness of form. Along with forging solid bar and tubing/pipe, participants will learn how to create pattern and texture on sheet/plate steel. Also covered will be joinery techniques and finishing processes.
All levels welcome.

Tandem Swing Bench by Daniel Souto, 2013. Forged square bar and spring steel with fabricated 3” x 1/2” flat stock and waxed Mahogany, approximately 30” x 21 1/2” x 47”.

Tandem Swing Bench by Daniel Souto, 2013. Forged square bar and spring steel with fabricated 3” x 1/2” flat stock and waxed Mahogany,
approximately 30” x 21 1/2” x 47”.


STEPHEN YUSKO
lives and works in Cleveland, Ohio, where he creates forged, machined, and fabricated steel vessels, furniture, and sculpture. He has taught at several schools and universities, including Haystack, Penland, and the State University of New York at Purchase. Stephen Yusko’s work has been exhibited widely, including at the National Ornamental Metal Museum, Tennessee and the Society for Contemporary Craft, Pennsylvania, and has been in several books of contemporary metalwork, including 500 Metal Vessels (Lark Books). stephenyusko.com

DANIEL SOUTO lives and works in Merida, Venezuela. In 1999, after studying for two years in the US, he returned to Venezuela to build Souto Studio, which specializes in functional objects and industrial forging. Working in an environment where resources are scarce, Daniel Souto often invents new, or modifies existing tooling required for each project. When not in his studio, he is part of an international team that works with children, taking them on expeditions to remote corners of the world.

Kings by Gerit Grimm, 2013. Stoneware, each approximately 21” x 27” x 12”.

Kings by Gerit Grimm, 2013. Stoneware, each approximately 21” x 27” x 12”.

1/CERAMICS

Sculpting with Wheel-Thrown Parts
This workshop will focus on the potters’ wheel as a tool for generating sculptural forms. Through creating individual shapes that are then altered off the wheel, multiple parts can be transformed into figurative scenes, body parts and everyday objects. This workshop will also cover techniques for building complex forms through the use of structural supports and shrink slabs to aid in firing. Demonstrations, lectures and discussions will provide examples that broaden the possibilities for making nearly anything imaginable with wheel thrown parts. Wheel-throwing experience required.

GERIT GRIMM grew up in Halle, German Democratic Republic. She received an MFA from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University. Currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, she has also taught at California State University at Long Beach; Pitzer College, California; Doane College, Nebraska; and Montana State University in Bozeman. Gerit Grimm has worked at major residencies such as McColl Center for Art + Innovation, Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Kohler Arts & Industry Program, and Archie Bray Foundation. geritgrimm.com

Autumn by MaJo Keleshian, 2014. Watercolor/ wax on paper, 11 1/2” x 5 1/2”.

Autumn by MaJo Keleshian, 2014. Watercolor/ wax on paper, 11 1/2” x 5 1/2”.

1/DRAWING

Expressive Drawing / Media /Methods
Drawing in formats both large and small, from set-ups and blindfolded, quickly and slowly—and using a wide variety of drawing materials, these are some of the daily exercises that will be presented throughout this workshop. Participants’ individual drawing projects may develop from these exercises or from ideas brought to the workshop. For those interested, there will be a group project. Through readings and images we will look at artists’ work and discuss their creative processes. Some familiarity with drawing is helpful, but all levels welcome.

MaJo KELESHIAN has taught taught drawing in the Department of Art at the University of Maine at Orono since 2000 and she has taught at Haystack a number of times. Her work has been shown in one-person and group exhibitions throughout New England, including several Maine Biennials, and is in the permanent collections of the University of Maine Museum of Art, Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, the US Department of State, and numerous private collections. MaJo Keleshian is currently on leave and working on a “windows” project.

Sifter by Susie Brandt, 2015. Aloha shirt bits netted in Safety Orange, 96” x 96”. Photo by Dan Meyers.

Sifter by Susie Brandt, 2015. Aloha shirt bits netted in Safety Orange, 96” x 96”. Photo by Dan Meyers.

1/FIBER

Fill Up / Stack Up / Twist and Shout
Methods of metaphoric material manufacture will include stitching, stowing, wringing, whorling, twisting, tying, plying, and piling. These and other growth systems will be used to produce an astonishing array of sculptural entities. Various methods of material procurement will be explored. This workshop is open to those interested in the poetic exploration of animal, vegetable, and mineral textile forms. All levels welcome.

Baltimore artist, SUSIE BRANDT’s textile-based work rummages through matters of utility, consumption, abundance, time, and devotion. She received a BFA from Philadelphia College of Art and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Recent work has been shown at Grizzly Grizzly Gallery in Philadelphia. Commissions can be seen at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and the University Medical Center in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Susie Brandt has also curated solo exhibitions of the work of Warren Seelig, Lenore Tawney, Sandra Brownlee, and Rowland Ricketts at Maryland Institute College of Art, where she is on the faculty of the Fiber and Foundation Departments.

A is for Apple by Greg Wilbur, 2014. Raised copper with heat patina; hammered brass with chemical patina, 6” high.

A is for Apple by Greg Wilbur, 2014. Raised copper with heat patina; hammered brass with chemical patina, 6” high.

1/METALS

The Art of Raising Metal
Transform a flat, 2D sheet of copper into a closed, 3D form in this ancient and dynamic process of raising metal. Using metal hammers and stakes, participants will learn the process of Western and Eastern concentric raising. Design possibilities, surface treatments, and patinas will be explored. This workshop will take a personal approach to closely monitor your technique development and efficiency. Hand strength is necessary, but all levels welcome.

GREG WILBUR is known for hammering/raising metal into sculptural and vessel forms, which he has done for forty years. He received a BS in Geography at the Oregon College of Education and a BFA in Jewelry and Metalsmithing from the University of Oregon, and has taught throughout the US, Canada, New Zealand, and France. Greg Wilbur has participated in over 100 Art and Craft shows including the Smithsonian Craft Fair and Philadelphia Crafts Show. In 2013 he curated East/West the Hammered Metal Object, a show that brought together twenty-two metal heads, from America and Japan—Velvet da Vinci Gallery in San Francisco and the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Portland, Oregon were two of the stops.

Adrift by Adam John Manley, 2010. Wood, steel, concrete, 7’ x 40”.

Adrift by Adam John Manley, 2010. Wood, steel, concrete, 7’ x 40”.

1/WOOD

Re-Interpreting the Familiar Object
As artists, designers, and makers we are constantly looking to the objects around us for inspiration and influence. We will examine the familiar objects and forms that intrigue us and explore their visual qualities, structural elements, and symbolic characteristics through the creation of new objects that reference and draw from these elements. Through collection, examination, and discussion we will interpret and reinterpret these forms and their contexts. From incorporation of everyday objects into functional forms, to exploration of the sculptural potential of chairs, students will examine the power that familiar objects have over us and use that power to their advantage. All levels welcome.

ADAM JOHN MANLEY is a studio artist, who lives and works in Portland, Maine. He received a BA in International Relations from the State University of New York at New Paltz and an MFA in Furniture and Woodworking from San Diego State University. He has taught the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, Maine College of Art, and University of New Hampshire. His work has been in solo exhibitions at Art Produce Gallery in San Diego, California and SPACE Gallery in Portland, Maine, and in group exhibitions at the Cole Art Center in Nacodoches, Texas and Center for Maine Contemporary Art, Rockport, Maine; and at the International Symposium on Electronic Arts in Alburquerque, New Mexico. Adam John Manley was a Windgate Fellow Artist in Residence at the University of Wisconsin at Madison during Fall 2014. adamjohnmanley.com

This workshop is supported by the Samuel J. Rosenfeld Faculty Fund for Sculpture in Ceramics and/or Wood.

1/VISITING WRITER*


LIA PURPURA
is the author of eight collections of essays, poems, and translations, most recently, It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful, (Viking/Penguin). She is Writer in Residence at The University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Lia Purpura has received Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Arts, and Fulbright Fellowships, and On Looking (essays) was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her work appears in The New Yorker, New Republic, Orion, and The Paris Review.

Living and Breathing Lyric Poems
What are the qualities of totally alive lyric writing? “Lyric” resists pinning, but how about “it’s musical,” “it surprises,” or even “it’s ecstatic.” We’ll read powerful poems, closely examine poetic moves and gestures (for the purpose of deepening perception and stealing fire), work with guided exercises, explore how to create and make daily use of a writer’s journal, and find ways to move “lyrical” experiences and ineffable states of being into language. Come with a blank notebook and pen.

Lia Pupura will be writing a monograph reflecting on contemporary craft as part of Haystack’s monograph series.

* Visiting artists augment the session with informal activities and are not workshop leaders.

 

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